30 January 2016

All talks are workable in a one-hour slot unless otherwise noted.

Cloud Native Java, part deux

You know what nobody has ever said to me? "I wish you'd covered even more in your 45 minute 'Cloud Native Java' talk!" And I listened! In this talk, we'll look at Spring Cloud.next to support modern microservices development, focusing on the things that really matter (or, at least, the things we've got cooking in Spring Boot 2.0 and Spring Cloud Finchley, both due before April or so):

The Bootiful Application

Alright, so maybe "bootiful" won't ever work, but I tried, and it was worth it too because you're reading this. Spring Boot, the new convention-over-configuration centric framework from the Spring team at Pivotal, marries Spring's flexibility with conventional, common sense defaults to make application development not just fly, but pleasant! Spring Boot aims to make address the common functional and non-functional requirements that gate quickly moving to production.

Join Spring developer advocate Josh Long for a look at what Spring Boot is, why it's turning heads, why you should consider it for your next application (REST, micro services, web, batch, big data, integration, whatever!) and how to get started.

Reactive Spring

Spring Framework 5 is here ! It introduces the Spring developer to a growing world of support for reactive programming across the Spring portfolio, starting with a new Netty-based web runtime, component model and module called Spring WebFlux, and then continuing to Spring Data Kay, Spring Security 5.0, Spring Boot 2.0 and Spring Cloud Finchley. Sure, it sounds like a lot, but don't worry! Join me, your guide, Spring developer advocate Josh Long, and we'll explore the wacky, wonderful world of Reactive Spring together.

Bootiful Testing (1-3h)

How would you feel if you knew that any pat of the code was at most a few minutes away from being shippable and delivered into production? How would you feel if you knew that any part of the code is a few ctrl+z's away from being shippable and delivered into production? Emboldened and confident? Test driven development (TDD) gives you that. TDD allows you to proceed with confidence that you're building the right thing. It provides you with imminent-horizons that you can meet and measure. TDD gives developers the confidence to go faster, secure in the knowledge that what they break they will fix and be able to improve. In this talk, join Spring Developer Advocate Josh Long (@starbuxman) as he looks at how to test Spring applications and services. We'll look at how to test basic components, mocks, how to take advantage of test slices, and how to test web applications. We'll also look at how to ensure that API producers and API consumers work well together using consumer driven contract testing (CDCT) without sacrificing the testing pyramid for end-to-end integration tests.

Bootiful Kotlin

Spring Boot, the convention-over-configuration centric framework from the Spring team at Pivotal, marries Spring's flexibility with conventional, common sense defaults to make application development on the JVM not just fly, but pleasant! Spring Boot aims to make address the common functional and non-functional requirements that gate quickly moving to production. The framework is as clean as it gets, wouldn't it be nice if the language matched its elegance?

Kotlin, the productivity-focused language from our friends at JetBrains, takes up the slack to make the experience leaner, cleaner and even more pleasant!

The Spring and Kotlin teams have worked hard to make sure that Kotlin and Spring Boot are a first-class experience for all developers trying to get to production, faster and safer. Come for the Spring and stay for the Bootiful Kotlin.

Cloud Native Java (3-6h)

“It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.” -W. Edwards Deming

Work takes time to flow through an organization and ultimately be deployed to production where it captures value. It’s critical to reduce time-to-production. Software - for many organizations and industries - is a competitive advantage. Organizations break their larger software ambitions into smaller, independently deployable, feature -centric batches of work - microservices. In order to reduce the round-trip between stations of work, organizations collapse or consolidate as much of them as possible and automate the rest; developers and operations beget “devops,” cloud-based services and platforms automate operations work and break down the need for ITIL tickets and change management boards. But velocity, for velocity’s sake, is dangerous. Microservices invite architectural complexity that few are prepared to address. In this talk, we’ll look at how high performance organizations like Ticketmaster, Alibaba, and Netflix make short work of that complexity with Spring Boot and Spring Cloud.

In this workshop we'll look at how to build cloud-native Java systems that are elastic, agile, observable and robust.

Cloud Native Java (5-10 Days)

“It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.” -W. Edwards Deming

Work takes time to flow through an organization and ultimately be deployed to production where it captures value. It’s critical to reduce time-to-production. Software - for many organizations and industries - is a competitive advantage.

Organizations break their larger software ambitions into smaller, independently deployable, feature -centric batches of work - microservices. In order to reduce the round-trip between stations of work, organizations collapse or consolidate as much of them as possible and automate the rest; developers and operations beget “devops,” cloud-based services and platforms automate operations work and break down the need for ITIL tickets and change management boards.

But velocity, for velocity’s sake, is dangerous. Microservices invite architectural complexity that few are prepared to address. In this talk, we’ll look at how high performance organizations like Ticketmaster, Alibaba, and Netflix make short work of that complexity with Spring Boot and Spring Cloud.

In this workshop we'll look at how to build cloud-native Java applications. A cloud native application is:

A cloud native application is one that is designed to fully exploit a cloud platform both in the application layer - where things decompose into microservices - and at the data layer where NoSQL offers better horizontal scaling and fitness for specific purpose. This is what we mean by elastic.

A cloud native application is one that is agile. It should be easy to write, change, test, deploy and operate. If the cost of change is prohibitive then normal people under normal situations won't do it. We must make doing the right thing - that which supports change - the easy thing.

A cloud native system is observable. It must support at-a-glance insight into what is happening in the system and support remediation. It must be instrumented at the application and systems levels to support the effort of crisis-management.

A cloud native application is one that is fault tolerant, or robust. If a service should fail, the system must be able to recover and degrade gracefully. Instead of trying to build a system that is predicated on the lie that things are highly available, build instead to optimize for time to remediation.

In this workshop we'll cover: